Psychiatric conditions in people suffering from pain

In most studies of patients suffering from pain, the occurrence of psychiatric conditions was firmly established and it was observed that these people had “affective and anxiety issues. It was found that the presence of back pain is 3-4 times more than it is in the general population.  However, the fundamental relationships have not been authenticated and are still contentious. Impact of social and psychosocial factors on pain indicate that physical symptoms are common in patients suffering from major depression.  Approximately 60% of patients with depression report pain symptoms at the time of diagnosis.

In a study of persons with moderate to severe depression at baseline were more likely to have developed headache and chest pain 3 years later.  The presence of a depressive disorder has also been demonstrated to increase the risk of developing chronic musculoskeletal pain Older age increased the risk for neck, back, and hip pain even more. Even after 8 years, depressed patients remained twice as likely to develop a new chronic pain condition compared to non-depressed individuals. In patients with chronic pain referred for evaluation to comprehensive pain programs, 8-50% has been reported to have current major depression

In another analysis of people suffering from the prevalence of depression was 12% in individuals with 3 or more pain complaints compared to only 1% in those with one or no pain complaints The U.S. Center for Health Statistics conducted an 8-year follow-up survey and found 32.8% of the general population reported chronic pain symptoms. Depression was the most important variable associated with persistent chronic pain.  If pain resulted in a loss of independence or mobility that decreased an individual’s participation in social activities, the risk of depression was significantly increased

Ethnicities show differences in how they express their discomfort and on how acceptable shows of pain and its tolerance are. Most obvious in adolescence, females suffer from this disorder more than males, and females reach out more. More unexplainable pains occur as people get older.  Typically, younger children complain of only one symptom, commonly abdominal pains or headaches. The older they get, the more varied the pain location as well as more locations and increasing frequency. Before treating a patient, a psychologist must learn as many facts as possible about the patient and the situation. A history of physical symptoms and a psychosocial history help narrow down possible correlations and causes. Psychosocial history covers the family history of disorders and worries about illnesses.

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